For the past few years, the popular molecule Resveratrol has been under intense scientific study in the scientific and medical communities and has shown miraculous results among test subjects from slowing down the growth of tumors to improving heart health and more.   But there are some side effects of Resveratrol that the user should be aware of before beginning any regimen that includes Resveratrol either in supplement or other forms.

 

Not Enough Evidence About the Safety of Resveratrol

Resveratrol is found in the natural world in peanuts, Japanese knotweed, blueberries, cranberries, pomegranates, and of course, in grapes (and subsequently, red wine made from grapes).   Anyone with much knowledge of the effects of alcohol on the body will know that if you drink too much red wine, you’ll get sick; this is, however, not due to the Resveratrol properties of the drink.  In fact, drinking red wine, although it does contain an abundance of Resveratrol, will not give you the effects of Resveratrol (unless you are drinking several full bottles of red wine daily – and if so, you have far worse problems than anything that Resveratrol could correct).

 

 

Because no one can tolerate that amount of red wine each day, supplements have been created that have varying strengths (and won’t cause you to become intoxicated).  The long term use of Resveratrol supplements on the human body cannot be touted as safe, however; the scientific community does not have enough information to make that declaration.

 

 

Let’s have a look at who should not take Resveratrol:

Because Resveratrol is associated with mild estrogenic activity that is not completely understood in the human population, women with estrogen sensitive condition, including some cancers should consult with her health care practitioner prior to taking Resveratrol supplements.

Children should not take Resveratrol.

Women who are pregnant, nursing mothers or those women who are trying to get pregnant should not take Resveratrol.

Resveratrol acts as a blood thinning agent, which negates its use among those people who are taking medication that thins the blood.

Anyone taking prescription medication of any kind should consult their doctor prior to taking Resveratrol.

 

Side Effects of Resveratrol

Although there are no completed Federal Drug Administration (FDA) trials on Resveratrol to render any accurate scientific evidence regarding the side effects of Resveratrol, so-called anecdotal side effects from users are generally reported as:

Dizziness often referred to as a “buzzed” feeling like a caffeine rush.

Insomnia that seems to appear out of nowhere and last for various periods of time.  Many Resveratrol users say that the insomnia symptoms fade after a few weeks.

Increases in blood pressure, sometimes dipping into the “high” range.

Intestinal side effects like stomach cramping and diarrhea; this may be due to the emodin content in certain Resveratrol supplements.

When choosing a Resveratrol supplement, it is always wise to choose a supplement made by a reputable manufacturer. As with any type of nutritional supplement, there are always some scandalous manufacturers out there who don’t use potent Resveratrol in their supplements – so going with a well-known or well-recommended supplement will maximize the benefits of Resveratrol.

For the past few years, the popular molecule Resveratrol has been under intense scientific study in the scientific and medical communities and has shown miraculous results among test subjects from slowing down the growth of tumors to improving heart health and more.  But there are some side effects of Resveratrol that the user should be aware of before beginning any regimen that includes Resveratrol either in supplement or other forms.

 

 

 

 

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